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Juvenile Huntington's Disease 
Stanford University
 
                             Great  information from Sanford University's HOPE HD Program .
                                                    Click on title to go directly to the information

The symptoms and characteristics of Juvenile Huntington's Disease.

 
Juvenile HD is a form of Huntington's Disease that affects children and teenagers. Like the adult form of the disease, juvenile HD is
hereditary in nature. Because of its hereditary character and early age of onset, a child with juvenile HD may also have a parent or
other close family member who is affected by adult-onset HD at the same time. This tendency to affect multiple generations simultaneously places an even greater strain upon families who are affected by juvenile HD.


What is juvenile HD?

What causes the large CAG repeat numbers seen in juvenile HD cases?

How are large repeat numbers related to the increased severity of juvenile HD?

How is juvenile HD inherited?

What are the early signs of juvenile HD?

What symptoms are common to both juvenile HD and adult-onset HD?

How are the symptoms of juvenile HD different from those of adult-onset HD?

What parts of the brain are affected in juvenile HD?

 
HOPES is a team of faculty and under-graduate students at Stanford University dedicated to making scientific information about Huntington's Disease (HD) more readily accessible to the public.   Our goal is to survey the rapidly growing scientific literature on HD and to consolidate this information into a coherent, reliable web resource that reflects current scientific understanding of HD.   We seek to provide accurate, helpful information about the causes of HD, existing treatment options, and recent advances in HD research.

We emphasize that we are not medical professionals, nor are we affiliated with the researchers or laboratories mentioned on our pages. The information we present is intended for educational purposes only and should not be construed as offering diagnoses or recommendations. We operate as a not-for-profit public service organization, and our funding is entirely from private sources.

Read all about  Stanford's HOPE HD Program