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Grief-Children and death:
Simple journal bridges gap between past and present

Author Gretchen Gaines-Lane, MSW, has created a book to help children reconstruct memories of deceased parents and other loved ones.
"My Memory Book: A Journal for Grieving Children" is a vehicle for the journaling technique that can help children with their own self-exploration as well as the grief they feel after a loss.

Helping Teenagers Cope with Grief
Each year thousands of teenagers experience the death of someone they love. When a parent, sibling, friend or relative dies, teens feel the overwhelming loss of someone who helped shape their fragile self-identities. And these feelings about the death become a part of their lives forever.

Some practical guides to help are shown in this article

Children and Grief -

When a family member dies, children react differently from adults. Preschool children usually see death as temporary and reversible, a belief reinforced by cartoon characters who "die" and "come to life" again. Children between five and nine begin to think more like adults about death, yet they still believe it will never happen to them or anyone they know.

Parents should be aware of normal childhood responses to a death in the family, as well as signs when a child is having difficulty coping with grief.